Overview of Management Technology

The growing importance of technology in all areas remains the need for a diverse group of qualified to drive the implementation and changes in technology professionals manage. Pursuing a degree in graduate school management technology may be right for the start of a career in management at every step, from hardware to information security within the organization.

Overview of Management Technology

Technology management professionals are in high demand: The unique combination of skills they possess. In this area, professionals are able to make decisions based on leadership and management, developing solutions to technological problems and dealing with technology management are making from the perspective of systems thinking.

For all management professionals, some of the skills necessary to handle the situation, including human resources, organizational design and communication, financial analysis and decision making. Technology management professionals combine this knowledge with specific IT systems and IT skills and knowledge to effectively lead and make decisions for the assessment, forecasts, strategies and decisions with a number of different areas of information technology lasts.

Technology Management Graduate Curriculum

There are a number of options for prospective students technology_management graduate school. While there are differences depending on the individual program and school, students most often complete a series of core courses, electives and a graduate program to complete the degree. This combination helps prepare graduates for the workforce skills transfer useful, relevant.

Since graduate courses in business technology, the students are able to provide a variety of skills and acquire valuable knowledge. Some courses are often technology_management information technology, operations, new technologies and ethics. In addition, students will take courses in business and management: the management of the supply chain, sales and marketing, and accounting technology.

These courses offer students the opportunity to acquire a broad basis for the development in the understanding of the basics of technology management. The optional project creation and teachers in the foundation subjects beginning students to focus on a specific area has technology_management his education. Examples of electives include knowledge management and relationship management. Masters level project combines knowledge, theory, and the ability of the doctoral student to examine won despite academic courses, how did capability can be transferred to a real world to find challenging business issue or a problem with the a solution, or has a specific scenario,

Develop your career with a Graduate Management Technology

IT professionals need to develop a variety of skills. In addition to the understanding of information technology professionals in this area must therefore be able to change manage IT systems and technologies that integrate the functional areas of the company to be the use of technology, and the principles of corporate governance to effectively the functions of a business driven technology to manage.

These skills will be needed in many different types of positions across all types of jobs in the non-profit organizations and educational institutions to private companies, by the Federal Government. From the director of information technology manager information, a degree in technology_management is a useful tool to tool to gain the experience and skills for all managerial positions in the departments of technology-based necessary.

Making meetings more exciting?


There was some interesting research out a few weeks ago from Epson and CEBR suggesting that the average UK office worker wastes 2 hours and 39 minutes in meetings every week.

* £26 billion: the amount lost from UK economy through time wasted in meetings in 2011
* 2 hours 39 minutes: the number of hours workers feel are wasted in meetings during an average week
* 49 minutes: the number of wasted minutes in meetings not made up for later
* 10 hours or over: the amount of time one in five senior managers and directors say they spend in meetings per week
* 11 minutes: the average amount of time it takes for people’s attention to drift in a meeting.



Nothing too surprising about any of this, other than perhaps how low some of them are (people concentrate in meetings for 11 minutes at a stretch – really???).

Anyway, I’ve got an article in Management Today providing some suggestions for dealing with this problem. The last one’s my favourite!

* Dispense with chairs
* Get social
* Opting out
* Avoid technology blunders
* Water cooler culture
* Be bold with timings
* Get creative with locations
* Weapons of mass distraction
* Use professional facilitation
* Better biscuits

Innovative talent management - financial services example



June tomorrow and only a couple of weeks to the Economist Talent Management conference on the 14th where I will acting as a media partner (ie I’ll be blogging a lot) and moderator (interviewing Ryan Blair).

I’ve been asking for innovative example of talent management in return for offering two tickets to go along to the Summit with me. There are two leading entries to date – this is the first, from Alan in a financial services firm:

“Hi Jon. We have a few things which I think wouldn't count as very revolutionary (web based recruitment tools, etc) but the thing we are doing which is my 'entry' for your ticket competition is to massively extend the notion of leadership for change to everyone in the company. Its been done before in a few places, but not many. The issue is this - we have 4000 people worldwide. We have lots of things we want to achieve, lots of changes we want to make, but it will be too slow if we try to manage and control everything through some central process. We could spend forever analysing the changes required, assessing who we think our talented people are to go on the teams, creating plans, coordinating thru a programme office, etc, etc.


You know the picture because we've all seen it many times before. It works to a degree, but its inefficient, regularly underdelivers and often creates new management controls which stifle the business.

So we're heading in the other direction. We have a few projects for things like IT systems that need to be built, but almost everything else is up for grabs. There's an overall direction in terms of aspirations for the company, but the changes required are defined locally by people who have the energy to do something about it and can convince other people to get involved. Anyone can volunteer to identify something that's holding us back and get rid of it, or something that's an opportunity and go for it.

This way our talented people are not the ones who pass a conceptual assessment, but the people who step up and move the company forward. Its early days but in a few months we are on the way to millions of dollars of new business, simplified processes and the beginnings of a new buzz in the place.
And all of this is being done with no managers/leaders controlling what we do, no additional budget and no extra resources. It won't stay that way forever, but its an interesting journey as we explore what's possible.

Technically this is not a 'talent management initiative', in that its not being directed by HR and no-one is using the word talent, but it is developing people, it is changing the business, and it is delivering real results in line with our strategy, so I'd argue that counts :-)”

Innovative talent management – pharmaceuticals example

Lovely day today for the first day of June – just the jubilee to get over (more on that soon) and then a busy and entertaining month ahead – including the Economist’s Talent Management Summit on 14th June.

I’ve been asking for innovative example of talent management in return for offering two tickets to go along to the Summit with me. There are two leading entries to date – this is the second – from Keith Wilson, Global Talent / Change Director at Astra Zeneca (I know many of you will already know Keith as I suspect he’s the most connected HR person on Linkedin!):

“Great challenge Jon. I'll answer with a mixture of what we're doing and what we have plans to do.

But firstly my approach. I don't see the question that we're trying to address changing - i.e. balancing 'what does the organisation need', with 'what's right for the individual'. But I do see rapid change in the available toolset.

I try to triangulate (my favourite word of the moment) across the 'science', 'art' and external best practice in Talent Management to ensure that we continually evolve to have an agile approach.

The Science: we're making good progress on getting the right systems in place. I continue to be impressed by the likes of SuccessFactors and Rypple and we're seeing increased interest in what big data implications are for HR. For me this is about timeliness, accuracy and point-of-need; giving Line Managers actionable information at their fingertips, and reducing noise/complexity.

The Art: this gets to the heart of your question and I think this differs very much company-to-company (depending on that lazy c-word, culture). What is the common Talent language and how are decisions made?. I see a continued tilt towards the 'art' of talent management (as opposed to the science) in more relationship-based orgs, where perception/judgement and the subtleties of influence are more important. I wonder if we'll see roads towards the science of measuring that, perhaps an internal organisational Klout score? I'd also suggest that increased focus on building a truly diverse reflection of global footprint is accelerating the need to answer these questions. When it comes to how we think, the concept of 'unconscious bias' is proving a useful conversation.

Best practice: I've observed, recently, what I think is an interesting trend. The likes of Google & Microsoft have been saying that traditional leadership/talent development programmes haven't been working for them and that they're focussing on 'stretch-assignments', 'planning the next 2 roles', 'global mobility'. This has always been our approach (and has proved very successful from pov of succession/retention) and it's interesting to see other industries moving towards it...

So.... I try to THINK in 3-D (triangulation), ACT quickly, simply, based on timely information, and BEHAVE responsibly, confidently and with integrity.

I'm interested to hear others points of view...???”



Love it – and I definitely think there’s going to be a big focus on aligning talent management with organisational influence rather than individual contribution over the next few years. More about that on this blog again soon as well.

Any comments for Keith, or me – do leave them here…

And if you think you can do better? – there’s still time to post your entry (the deadline has been extended till the end of the weekend).

But if you don’t make it you can still get a 15% discount by quoting SHCM when you book.







Picture credit: Picking up on Keith’s cue, I tried to use Twiangulate for him ( @kjw_hrd ), the Economist ( @EG_LeadershipTE ) and myself ( @joningham ) to analyse our relationships but it didn’t tell me that much – other than Keith doesn’t use Twitter as much as he does Linkedin!


Technorati Tags: Economist,talent management,summit,conference,London,2012,innovation,pharma,influence,klout,Keith Wilson,AstraZeneca



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Don’t Jubilee’ve It!



Sorry for the lack of posts last week but I was away and didn’t manage to get any posts prepared early.

And why was I way? – well in case you didn’t notice it was the dear Queen’s diamond? jubilee last week. That meant we all got an extra day’s bank holiday, delaying the UK’s exit from recession. And also I really didn’t want to be around.

Isn’t it time the UK grew up and became a republic? I certainly can’t see how any HR practitioner could support the current system. Take any aspect of organisational management that we aim to deal with and the retention of monarchy makes absolutely no sense in this (the UK) organisation:

* Organisational culture: the system reinforces the belief that people progress based upon birth or luck rather than by skill or hard work. I don’t think it’s any accident that the US’ republican culture produces such a higher proportion of entrepreneurs than the UK.
* Organisation design: the system of princes and princesses, lord and ladies, dukes and duchesses etc may not represent the way real work gets done but it’s still an important shadow system. It may provide a source of fascination for tourists and my six-year old daughter but removing it would bring the top and bottom of our organisation much closer together and provide a much needed boost to social mobility.
* Performance management: one of the main reasons people seem keen to keep the monarchy is that the Queen is doing such a good job. And I’ll admit that she is, but I really don’t think it’s that hard to do (and half of the time I don’t think it’s her arm waving anyway!). OK, she doesn’t get much holiday, but then with all of that travel and horse riding – never mind the water ski lake at Balmorel! – does she really need one?
* Recruitment – this is the crux. The Queen may be doing OK but do we really want to leave the nation’s fortunes down to this particular family? Elections may not be perfect either but at least you’re not tied to the same person for their lifetime.



Catching up on the news (though I don’t think the papers’ or even the BBC’s coverage always counts as such), despite the heavy rain, there do seem to have been a lot of people celebrating, but is this just because 2m people (including most of the republicans?) deserted the country instead?

And anyway, I’m all for a good party – but surely there are more constructive and important things to celebrate?

Not the English Summer however.

Social Media in HR Summit, Dublin, Ireland





I’ve recently arranged to speak at another couple of great conferences over the next few months. On Thursday 27th / Friday 28th September I’ll be speaking at Fleming Europe’s Social Media in HR Summit held in Dublin:



How to leverage social media properly?

Are organizations exploiting social media to reach external audiences?

Who is using social media in the workplace?

Do organizations provide any social media training to employees who engage in social media activities?

These are only a few questions that were asked in the SHRM Survey 2011: Social Media in the Workplace. The results were rather startling. They revealed that while 68 % of organizations leverage social media to reach external audiences, only 27 % of them provide employees with training on how to work with social media.

Are you among them? Are you looking for a change?



At this one-of-a-kind event participants will meet highly qualified experts from Microsoft, Deloitte, LinkedIn, Twitter, Nokia, Orange, Ford, Unilever, Vodafone, Dell, Samsung, HSBC, etc. These forward-looking, top-level enthusiasts working in the strategic communications industry and new media will focus on the importance of embedding digital thinking and social media impacts in HR practice.

In order to bridge the gap between the necessary and real-life practice we have chosen topics including social engagement, recruitment futurology, digital networks, social media footprints, risks and exploitation of social media strategies and much more.

Fleming Europe's premiere cross-industry HR event is aimed at Senior Executives responsible for Talent, Recruiting, Knowledge Management, Employee Engagement and Learning as well as Communication Executives responsible for Employer Branding, Internal Communication and Social Media.

HR Technology Europe





The other conference this Autumn with a big focus on social media will be HR Technology Europe which I’ll be chairing for the second year. On the main stage, amongst other speakers will be:

* David Hernandez, Société Générale
* James Purvis, CERN
* Nalin Miglani, Tata Global Beverages
* Anthony Shaw and Simon Linares, Telefonica Digital
* Roel Dumont, Tessenderlo
* Mark Martin, Direct Line
* Thomas Otter, Gartner
* Sarah White
* Josh Bersin
* Naomi Bloom.



And as well as the main technology conference , there are several different break-out shows including ‘Social Enterprise’ moderated by Stowe Boyd and featuring Luis Suarez from IBM, Andy Boyd from Shell and Nicolas Rolland from Danone.



There’s also ‘Next Gen Talent’ which includes Nick Holley from Henley arguing that most talent management is an irrelevant and Heiko Fisher on why your company should look like a Burrito!



The dates are 25 & 26 October, it’s at the RAI in Amsterdam and I hope that I’ll see you there.



Technorati Tags: HR,talent,technology,HRtech,Europe,conference,Amsterdam,2012,social,enterprise,next gen,generation



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ECTalent - Doug Baillie, Unilever on talent and the business

annual talent management summit.

We're kicking off with a keynote from Doug Baillie, Unilever's fairly new CHRO (and new to HR) sharing his secrets of aligning the development of high-potential talent pools with overall business goals.

So Doug's starting off talking about Unilever's business strategy - and how they place HR in the middle of it.




It's another early mention for social media - which we'll be talking more about in the panel on 'next gen' that I'll be chairing later.

And there's a crisis of leadership too. Doug's talking about this in the context of social responsibility but I'd extend this to the social media agenda too. (Eg - without me and just a couple of others - the general lack of social media stuff taking place at the conference.)

The question which keeps Doug awake at night is where does he find the talent to double their business? A critical element of this is having a strong employer brand - especially in the emerging and developing world.

But leadership development is probably the most critical thing they need to do - helping their leadership to lead in a very different way - engaging everyone working in the organisation. They spend a lot of time putting people into boxes and ranking them.

That's it - so maybe talking about 'secrets' was overselling the session? That's probably unfair as it was a very short presentation and I would have loved to hear more about 'leading in a very different way' and the following slide (which links to my focus on creating value)3A




But as the session is finishing I'm experiencing the perception of a gap between the size of the business challenges Unilever is facing and what they are doing to develop their talent. There's got to be more...

Eg Doug's talking about the next gen wanting fast change between consumer products, investment banking etc etc. Well OK then, which investment banks is Unilever talking to to share some of their next gen resources?

It'd be great to hear from other attendees at the summit (and other readers) what you felt about this...


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